Home

Management in the New World Order – Concepts and Practises from India

The emerging new world order points to a power shift to the East where the growing markets of China and India are likely to propel these countries towards economic power houses. Hence the business practices of the orient are likely to assume greater importance in future. The recent economic downturn and the corporate scandals in the West have also led to a creditability gap in the management theories and practices. Consequently, there is an increasingly felt need for new management paradigms for business which do not necessarily originate either from North America or Western Europe.

The ‘India Way’ published recently brings the Indian business models into acute focus wherein it identifies some aspects of doing business in India which are distinctly different from the way business is conducted in the USA.  While this work could be an important pointer towards India and the Indian way of doing business, there is a lot about Indian way of doing business that could be harnessed by an all-inclusive conference on this theme. Hence a conference dwelling on the concepts and practises from India along several dimensions including – philosophical, mythological, sociological, organizational, entrepreneurial and strategic aspects of business is being organized.

 

This conference aims at exploring areas such as, wisdom from Indian literature, Indian philosophical orientation, lessons from Indian business communities, impact of business clusters in India, etc. which have been drawn into various tracks. Papers are invited from academicians, practitioners and research scholars who have explored aspects of Indian ethos, culture, business and management.

Track I: Wisdom from Indian Literature

Papers in this track should focus on distilling and interpreting the wisdom from Indian epics and treatises for use in modern management. It would be preferable if structured qualitative analyses are adopted for papers in this track. Papers that highlight applications of such concepts in businesses in India or abroad and also that which develop new conceptual frameworks represented in the form of a chart or a diagram would find ready acceptance for this track. One could also try and bring out the uniqueness of the Indian approaches by comparing them with the western models and practices. Some examples of Indian epics and treatises follow, however these are not exclusive and authors could consider other similar treatises:

  • Vedas / Upanishads / Bhagwad Gita
  • Epics – Mahabharata / Ramayana
  • Treatises — Arthashastra, Bijaganita, Charaka Samhita, Natya Shastra, Siddhanta Siromani, Sushruta Samhita, Thirukural etc.

Track II: Indian Philosophical Orientation

Papers in this track should focus on distilling and interpreting the wisdom from Indian schools of thought for use in modern management. It would be preferable if structured qualitative analyses are adopted for papers in this track. Case studies highlighting the application of such concepts in businesses in India or abroad and also that which develop new conceptual frameworks would find ready acceptance for this track. One could also try and bring out the uniqueness of the Indian approaches by comparing them with the western models and practices. Some examples of Indian schools of thought follow, however these are not exclusive and authors could consider other schools: 

  • Treatises from Astika schools of thought – Advaita / Samkhya / Vaisesika etc. (e.g. Bhajagovindam)
  • Treatise from Nastika schools — Charvaka / Jainism / Buddhism

 

Track III: Lessons from Indian Business Communities

Papers in this track should focus on drawing lessons from Indian business communities for use in modern management. It would be preferable if structured qualitative analyses / case studies / ethnographic study approaches are adopted for papers in this track. The case studies presented in the papers may highlight the traits of selected communities or leaders from a community or unique businesses that a community engages in or unique business practices followed. Some examples of Indian business communities follow, however these are not exhaustive and authors could consider other communities: 

  • Marwaris
  • Parsees
  • Nadars
  • Chettiars

 

Track IV: Impact of Business Clusters/ Ecosystems in India

Business clusters have existed in India for a very long time. However, it was Michel Porter who championed the cluster based studies. His conceptual framework called the Strategic Diamond is has had a significant contributions to the study of business clusters. Papers in this track should focus on the impact of business clusters on Indian economy for use in modern management. These could be physical clusters, virtual clusters or ecosystems. Papers that validate or improve upon the Porter’s Diamond model would be greatly appreciated. It would be preferable if structured qualitative analyses / case studies / empirical approaches are adopted for papers in this track.  Focus may also be given to evolution, growth, contribution to Indian economy, decadence – decline, connectedness within economy, and competitiveness of clusters resulting in the development of conceptual framework.

Some examples of Indian business clusters follow, however these are not exclusive and authors could consider other clusters: 

  • Auto Cluster
  • Textile Cluster
  • Leather Cluster
  • Diesel Engine Cluster

Some of the notable ecosystems include:

  • Telecom ecosystem
  • Airlines ecosystem
  • Retail as an ecosystem
  • Bollywood/Kollywood ecosystem

Track V: Practises of Indian Businesses

Some of the traditional Indian business houses that continue to follow typical family business practices are growing bigger and are making their presence felt in the global markets too. Papers in this track should focus on drawing lessons from Indian businesses and business groups for use in modern management. It would be preferable if some structured qualitative analyses / case studies / empirical approaches are adopted for papers in this track. Some examples of practises follow, however these are not exclusive and authors could consider other practises: 

  • Human Resource practises and Ethical issues
  • Accounting practises and the Partha System
  • Family business practises — keeping the family & business separate; succession planning; outsider intervention etc.
  • Business grouping practises — appropriateness of holding structure, cross subsidization of efficiencies, Angeling new ventures by groups etc.
  • Supply chain practices – innovative and cost effective practices
  • Business model Innovations
  • Initiatives addressing the bottom of the Pyramid

 

Track VI: Growing Indian Multinationals

Papers in this track should focus on drawing lessons from the emergence and growth of Indian multinationals for use in modern management. It would be preferable if structured qualitative analyses / case studies / empirical approaches are adopted for papers in this track. Papers could study an industry, an individual company or can also make cross industry comparisons. Some examples of Indian sectors follow, however these are not exclusive and authors could consider other sectors: 

  • Experiences from Indian IT sector
  • Experiences from Indian Pharmaceutical sector
  • Competitiveness of Indian Exports

 

Track VII: Leadership lessons from India

Papers in this track should focus on drawing lessons from Indian businesses as a whole from a leadership perspective for use in modern management. It would be preferable if structured qualitative analyses / case studies / empirical approaches are adopted for papers in this track. Some examples of leadership perspectives follow, however these are not exclusive and authors could consider other perspectives: 

  • India Way – finding a socio-capitalistic model
  • Venturing with limited resources
  • Jugaad and not structured innovation
  • Thriving diversity of operating models  

 

 

Comments are closed.